SUPPORT MATERIAL FOR BUS PROJECTS EXPRESSION OF INTEREST 2019

 

THE JEWEL

Claire Robertson

 

I would like to acknowledge the traditional owners of the land to which this work makes reference, the Big River and North tribes and pay my respect to elders past, present and future.

Colonial history has edited out and silenced Aboriginal people and while their stories are not mine to tell, this work is dedicated to revealing the facade of a neat history.

The film Jewelled Nights has been lost, however, through reconstructing it, a new self reflexive story can be told.

The work seeks to point out that colonialism still prevails. It is not in the past, but each day we step into the set that our ancestors built and until change is made, we will continue to re-perform it.

This page contains the following supporting material:

  • Research images/ screen descriptions/ sketch ups that are indicative only of proposed work for Bus Projects

  • Examples of Previous work

  • Bio and link to CV


RESEARCH IMAGES, SCREEN DESCRIPTIONS & SKETCH UPS

The following images are indicative only and do not represent the actual work.

Screen 1:

Robertson performs as Marie Bjelke Petersen. The loop will depict a close up of a hand holding an osmiridium nibbed fountain pen. It writes lines from the novel ‘Jewelled Nights’ from the perspective of Elaine disguised as Dick:

“The boy closed his eyes for a moment. The beauty was overwhelming. It stupified. It stunned. It terrified.“

This scene presents this colonial view of the landscape as something to fear, one that is often depicted within Australian cinema. It points out a disconnect with the landscape. Marie Bjelke Petersen based Jewelled Nights around stories of the osmiridium prospectors in Zeehan and the bluff around Savage River. This is where osmiridium was first discovered. Osmiridium was mostly used to make artillery and pen nibs, both white, male authors in colonial history.

 
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Screen 2:

Robertson, dressed as ‘Eileen’ pretending to be ‘Dick’ from Louise Lovely’s silent film ‘Jewelled Nights.’ Robertson performs a repetitive ritual of pegging out and claiming land with pan and shovel in hand. This ritual of claiming land with disregard to the Big River and North tribes. She performs in front of a revealed set, blaring time and bringing the performance into the present.

 
  Photo of Louise Lovely in 'Jewelled Nights' 1925. Image from the National Film and Sound Archive Australia

Photo of Louise Lovely in 'Jewelled Nights' 1925. Image from the National Film and Sound Archive Australia

  Claire Robertson performing as Louise Lovely for 'The Jewel' (in progress) Artist page in Issue 88, 2018 Eyeline Magazine

Claire Robertson performing as Louise Lovely for 'The Jewel' (in progress) Artist page in Issue 88, 2018 Eyeline Magazine

 
 

Artist Claire Robertson performing as Louise Lovely with revealed set. In this sketch up Robertson was experimenting with making reference to the masculine act of conquering of the landscape as being seen as heroic. This footage is indicative of costuming and set. The final work will be portrait, not landscape format and will show Robertson pegging land. The video imagery that will then be disintegrated via VHS repetitive recording.

 
 

Screen 3:

Robertson reenacts a romanticised scene from her childhood where her mother would awake at dawn and run through the landscape, looking into the freedom of the horizon. Her mother was the wife of a mine manager and spent years in remote areas of Australia with little access to a car and ability to leave the mine camp. At one of the locations, during her daily run, she would pass the loan grave of a woman who had also attempted to join her mine manager husband in 1986, but died of heat exhaustion before she arrived. Having travelled directly from Europe she was dressed, as a lady did at the time, with petticoats to her ankles, a high neckline and gloves all in 40 degree heat.

The lone grave represents colonial fear of the landscape - seen as harsh for it’s difference to the European landscape. The artist runs on a treadmill with a backdrop of the landscape and grave. The poorly constructed set is slowly revealed as the camera zooms out. As the video loops, Robertson runs endlessly and fruitlessly, performing and re-performing the generations before her.

 

Screen 4:

The fourth screen is intentionally black sits separately from the other three. It represents the stories untold.

 
 Example of static/ artifacting from VHS disintegration

Example of static/ artifacting from VHS disintegration

 

Other reference material:

 
 
 
 Photo of Louise Lovely directing on set for 'Jewelled Nights' 1925. Image from the National Film and Sound Archive Australia

Photo of Louise Lovely directing on set for 'Jewelled Nights' 1925. Image from the National Film and Sound Archive Australia

 Claire Robertson on set for 'The Jewel'. Like Louise LovelyI will play both filmmaker and performer.

Claire Robertson on set for 'The Jewel'. Like Louise LovelyI will play both filmmaker and performer.


EXAMPLES OF PREVIOUS WORK

Click on images to view video and descriptions

 Far From Here, 2016

Far From Here, 2016

 Above & Below, 2017

Above & Below, 2017

 Opera & Art in Question, 2016

Opera & Art in Question, 2016

BIO

Claire Robertson is a Melbourne-based artist working in a range of mediums; specialising in video and installation. Adapting cinematic devices, she responds to different sites using video to explore personal and broader social narratives. Her work questions the fine line between interior and exterior, ‘real’ and ‘imagined’ space—where the physical setting serves as an outward manifestation of the human psyche. Her past works have investigated themes of the prevailing colonial relationships to the Australian desert landscape through fly-in fly-out mining camps in the Pilbara; architecture as façade through the heterotopia of a hotel in Long Beach, New York.  

Robertson holds a Masters of Fine Arts from Parsons New School of Design (New York)/ RMIT (Melbourne) 2012 and have exhibited extensively nationally and internationally including exhibitions in the US, Italy, Sweden, China, Hong Kong and Canada. Her work is held in the Documentation Center for Visual Arts, Milan.

Link to CV